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Bernie Sanders - R_P - Jun 1, 2020 - 3:36pm
 
Index » Regional/Local » USA/Canada » Those lovable acronym guys & gals Page: Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 25, 26, 27
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bokey

bokey Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 13, 2013 - 7:22am

 kurtster wrote:

Just want to add a couple things . . .

Knowledge of how we are observed will have a chilling effect on the long held right to freely associate with anyone we choose for any reason we choose.   Its conceivable that people will no longer contact each other for fear of certain conclusions being made.   It can affect the nature of  innocent relationships.

Cell phones have become GPS devices and the location of the phone will be known at all times.   Travel will no longer be anonymous.   I find it conceivable that with the search of coordinates and time references, one can be linked to a random event such as a robbery of a store.   The example I try and make would be that you are getting gas at a station that is in the process of being robbed.   You may or may not see anything.   If you do, you might choose to split so as not to be caught up in possible violence or not be a witness with all the personal intrusion that follows, not to mention reprisals from the perps.   If a querry is made as to what phones were there at the time of the robbery, you are found to be there and can be called in to explain your presence there which would be totally innocent, but you would have to explain your innocence.

And only to complete the above thought . . . let's say that this gas station is in a place that is far away from where you might ordinarily be.   Were you there meeting a lover while the wife thought you were working late ?   Or did you go there to score a bag of sumthin ?   Maybe you were driving a buddy to a medical marijuana dispensary.   While the transaction was cash to remain anonymous, you were noticed being at that location for 20 to 30 minutes.   Explain your presence there sir and OBTW would you mind peeing in this cup while we have you here . . .

 

 Bokey said {#Silenced}

 Oh wait. It's worse than that.
You do realize that the NSA can remotely access your cell phone and activate the microphone without your knowledge? They can monitor any private conversations in your own home without your knowledge.


ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 13, 2013 - 7:14am

 kurtster wrote:
Knowledge of how we are observed will have a chilling effect on the long held right to freely associate with anyone we choose for any reason we choose.  Its conceivable that people will no longer contact each other for fear of certain conclusions being made.  It can affect the nature of  innocent relationships.
 
Sorry but this is not new or unique to government observation. It is life.
kurtster

kurtster Avatar

Location: drifting
Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 13, 2013 - 6:57am

 miamizsun wrote:

“Metadata” Can Tell the Government More About You Than the Content of Your Phonecalls

The Electronic Frontier Foundation points out:

What government officials are trying to say is that disclosure of metadata—the details about phone calls, without the actual voice—isn’t a big deal, not something for Americans to get upset about if the government knows. Let’s take a closer look at what they are saying:

  • They know you rang a phone sex service at 2:24 am and spoke for 18 minutes. But they don’t know what you talked about.
  • They know you called the suicide prevention hotline from the Golden Gate Bridge. But the topic of the call remains a secret.
  • They know you spoke with an HIV testing service, then your doctor, then your health insurance company in the same hour. But they don’t know what was discussed.
  • They know you received a call from the local NRA office while it was having a campaign against gun legislation, and then called your senators and congressional representatives immediately after. But the content of those calls remains safe from government intrusion.
  • They know you called a gynecologist, spoke for a half hour, and then called the local Planned Parenthood’s number later that day. But nobody knows what you spoke about.

Sorry, your phone records—oops, “so-called metadata”—can reveal a lot more about the content of your calls than the government is implying. Metadata provides enough context to know some of the most intimate details of your lives.  And the government has given no assurances that this data will never be correlated with other easily obtained data.


please see more here


 
Just want to add a couple things ...

Knowledge of how we are observed will have a chilling effect on the long held right to freely associate with anyone we choose for any reason we choose.  Its conceivable that people will no longer contact each other for fear of certain conclusions being made.  It can affect the nature of  innocent relationships.

Cell phones have become GPS devices and the location of the phone will be known at all times.  Travel will no longer be anonymous.  I find it conceivable that with the search of coordinates and time references, one can be linked to a random event such as a robbery of a store.  The example I try and make would be that you are getting gas at a station that is in the process of being robbed.  You may or may not see anything.  If you do, you might choose to split so as not to be caught up in possible violence or not be a witness with all the personal intrusion that follows, not to mention reprisals from the perps.  If a querry is made as to what phones were there at the time of the robbery, you are found to be there and can be called in to explain your presence there which would be totally innocent, but you would have to explain your innocence.

And only to complete the above thought ... let's say that this gas station is in a place that is far away from where you might ordinarily be.  Were you there meeting a lover while the wife thought you were working late ?  Or did you go there to score a bag of sumthin ?  Maybe you were driving a buddy to a medical marijuana dispensary.  While the transaction was cash to remain anonymous, you were noticed being at that location for 20 to 30 minutes.  Explain your presence there sir and OBTW would you mind peeing in this cup while we have you here ...
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 13, 2013 - 5:50am

“Metadata” Can Tell the Government More About You Than the Content of Your Phonecalls

The Electronic Frontier Foundation points out:

What government officials are trying to say is that disclosure of metadata—the details about phone calls, without the actual voice—isn’t a big deal, not something for Americans to get upset about if the government knows. Let’s take a closer look at what they are saying:

  • They know you rang a phone sex service at 2:24 am and spoke for 18 minutes. But they don’t know what you talked about.
  • They know you called the suicide prevention hotline from the Golden Gate Bridge. But the topic of the call remains a secret.
  • They know you spoke with an HIV testing service, then your doctor, then your health insurance company in the same hour. But they don’t know what was discussed.
  • They know you received a call from the local NRA office while it was having a campaign against gun legislation, and then called your senators and congressional representatives immediately after. But the content of those calls remains safe from government intrusion.
  • They know you called a gynecologist, spoke for a half hour, and then called the local Planned Parenthood’s number later that day. But nobody knows what you spoke about.

Sorry, your phone records—oops, “so-called metadata”—can reveal a lot more about the content of your calls than the government is implying. Metadata provides enough context to know some of the most intimate details of your lives.  And the government has given no assurances that this data will never be correlated with other easily obtained data.


please see more here



ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 13, 2013 - 4:29am

 RichardPrins wrote:


 
I'd been thinking I'd seen a good anti-NSA rant but forgot what movie it was in... 
R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Jun 12, 2013 - 10:55pm


islander

islander Avatar

Location: Seattle
Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 12, 2013 - 9:42pm

 RichardPrins wrote:

Partly, but it's the title on his name plate, which makes me automatically deferent... {#Mrgreen}

  


bokey

bokey Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 12, 2013 - 9:39pm

 RichardPrins wrote:

{#Clap}

 
Bokey says {#Silenced}.
oldviolin

oldviolin Avatar

Location: esse quam videri
Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 12, 2013 - 9:11pm

 RichardPrins wrote:

Partly, but it's the title on his name plate, which makes me automatically deferent... {#Mrgreen}

{#Lol}{#High-five}

 


R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Jun 12, 2013 - 9:09pm

 oldviolin wrote:
Let me guess; it's the body language that convinces you, right?{#Wink} 

Partly, but it's the title on his name plate, which makes me automatically deferent... {#Mrgreen}
GeneP59

GeneP59 Avatar

Location: On the edge of tomorrow looking back at yesterday.
Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 12, 2013 - 9:07pm

tin foil hat
GeneP59

GeneP59 Avatar

Location: On the edge of tomorrow looking back at yesterday.
Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 12, 2013 - 9:05pm

Shhhhhhh! they heard that.
bokey

bokey Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 12, 2013 - 9:03pm

Bokey says {#Silenced}.
oldviolin

oldviolin Avatar

Location: esse quam videri
Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 12, 2013 - 8:54pm

 RichardPrins wrote:

{#Clap}

 
Let me guess; it's the body language that convinces you, right?{#Wink}


R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Jun 12, 2013 - 8:45pm


{#Clap}
Red_Dragon

Red_Dragon Avatar



Posted: Jun 12, 2013 - 7:48pm


bokey

bokey Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Jun 12, 2013 - 7:42pm

 RichardPrins wrote:
(. . . ) This is the undisputed domain of General Keith Alexander, a man few even in Washington would likely recognize. Never before has anyone in America’s intelligence sphere come close to his degree of power, the number of people under his command, the expanse of his rule, the length of his reign, or the depth of his secrecy. A four-star Army general, his authority extends across three domains: He is director of the world’s largest intelligence service, the National Security Agency; chief of the Central Security Service; and commander of the US Cyber Command. As such, he has his own secret military, presiding over the Navy’s 10th Fleet, the 24th Air Force, and the Second Army.

Alexander runs the nation’s cyberwar efforts, an empire he has built over the past eight years by insisting that the US’s inherent vulnerability to digital attacks requires him to amass more and more authority over the data zipping around the globe. In his telling, the threat is so mind-bogglingly huge that the nation has little option but to eventually put the entire civilian Internet under his protection, requiring tweets and emails to pass through his filters, and putting the kill switch under the government’s forefinger. “What we see is an increasing level of activity on the networks, ” he said at a recent security conference in Canada. “I am concerned that this is going to break a threshold where the private sector can no longer handle it and the government is going to have to step in. ”

In its tightly controlled public relations, the NSA has focused attention on the threat of cyberattack against the US—the vulnerability of critical infrastructure like power plants and water systems, the susceptibility of the military’s command and control structure, the dependence of the economy on the Internet’s smooth functioning. Defense against these threats was the paramount mission trumpeted by NSA brass at congressional hearings and hashed over at security conferences.

But there is a flip side to this equation that is rarely mentioned: The military has for years been developing offensive capabilities, giving it the power not just to defend the US but to assail its foes. Using so-called cyber-kinetic attacks, Alexander and his forces now have the capability to physically destroy an adversary’s equipment and infrastructure, and potentially even to kill. Alexander—who declined to be interviewed for this article—has concluded that such cyberweapons are as crucial to 21st-century warfare as nuclear arms were in the 20th.

And he and his cyberwarriors have already launched their first attack. The cyberweapon that came to be known as Stuxnet was created and built by the NSA in partnership with the CIA and Israeli intelligence in the mid-2000s. The first known piece of malware designed to destroy physical equipment, Stuxnet was aimed at Iran’s nuclear facility in Natanz. By surreptitiously taking control of an industrial control link known as a Scada (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system, the sophisticated worm was able to damage about a thousand centrifuges used to enrich nuclear material. (. . . )


 
Bokey says {#Silenced}
R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Jun 12, 2013 - 7:38pm

(...) This is the undisputed domain of General Keith Alexander, a man few even in Washington would likely recognize. Never before has anyone in America’s intelligence sphere come close to his degree of power, the number of people under his command, the expanse of his rule, the length of his reign, or the depth of his secrecy. A four-star Army general, his authority extends across three domains: He is director of the world’s largest intelligence service, the National Security Agency; chief of the Central Security Service; and commander of the US Cyber Command. As such, he has his own secret military, presiding over the Navy’s 10th Fleet, the 24th Air Force, and the Second Army.

Alexander runs the nation’s cyberwar efforts, an empire he has built over the past eight years by insisting that the US’s inherent vulnerability to digital attacks requires him to amass more and more authority over the data zipping around the globe. In his telling, the threat is so mind-bogglingly huge that the nation has little option but to eventually put the entire civilian Internet under his protection, requiring tweets and emails to pass through his filters, and putting the kill switch under the government’s forefinger. “What we see is an increasing level of activity on the networks,” he said at a recent security conference in Canada. “I am concerned that this is going to break a threshold where the private sector can no longer handle it and the government is going to have to step in.”

In its tightly controlled public relations, the NSA has focused attention on the threat of cyberattack against the US—the vulnerability of critical infrastructure like power plants and water systems, the susceptibility of the military’s command and control structure, the dependence of the economy on the Internet’s smooth functioning. Defense against these threats was the paramount mission trumpeted by NSA brass at congressional hearings and hashed over at security conferences.

But there is a flip side to this equation that is rarely mentioned: The military has for years been developing offensive capabilities, giving it the power not just to defend the US but to assail its foes. Using so-called cyber-kinetic attacks, Alexander and his forces now have the capability to physically destroy an adversary’s equipment and infrastructure, and potentially even to kill. Alexander—who declined to be interviewed for this article—has concluded that such cyberweapons are as crucial to 21st-century warfare as nuclear arms were in the 20th.

And he and his cyberwarriors have already launched their first attack. The cyberweapon that came to be known as Stuxnet was created and built by the NSA in partnership with the CIA and Israeli intelligence in the mid-2000s. The first known piece of malware designed to destroy physical equipment, Stuxnet was aimed at Iran’s nuclear facility in Natanz. By surreptitiously taking control of an industrial control link known as a Scada (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system, the sophisticated worm was able to damage about a thousand centrifuges used to enrich nuclear material. (...)

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