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COVID-19 - kurtster - Jan 17, 2021 - 8:55am
 
Freedom of speech? - miamizsun - Jan 17, 2021 - 8:22am
 
honk if you think manbird and OV are one and the same ent... - miamizsun - Jan 17, 2021 - 8:09am
 
Things You Thought Today - Lazy8 - Jan 17, 2021 - 7:50am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - miamizsun - Jan 17, 2021 - 7:48am
 
Social Media Are Changing Everything - black321 - Jan 17, 2021 - 7:37am
 
Trump - miamizsun - Jan 17, 2021 - 7:36am
 
Today in History - Red_Dragon - Jan 17, 2021 - 7:36am
 
Best movies ever? - rhahl - Jan 17, 2021 - 3:41am
 
Breaking News - kurtster - Jan 16, 2021 - 4:37pm
 
Automotive Lust - KurtfromLaQuinta - Jan 16, 2021 - 4:28pm
 
Language - rhahl - Jan 16, 2021 - 1:03pm
 
Trump Lies - ScottN - Jan 16, 2021 - 12:05pm
 
Outstanding Covers - R_P - Jan 16, 2021 - 11:48am
 
The Obituary Page - ScottN - Jan 16, 2021 - 8:47am
 
Mixtape Culture Club - KurtfromLaQuinta - Jan 16, 2021 - 6:27am
 
What Are You Going To Do Today? - miamizsun - Jan 16, 2021 - 5:54am
 
Vocabulary Quiz - rhahl - Jan 16, 2021 - 5:31am
 
Flim Festivals on Now - rhahl - Jan 16, 2021 - 3:59am
 
2020 Elections - haresfur - Jan 15, 2021 - 8:44pm
 
Baby words that stuck in your family - Manbird - Jan 15, 2021 - 8:06pm
 
Name My Band - oldviolin - Jan 15, 2021 - 2:29pm
 
Our tolerance for opposing views - Isabeau - Jan 15, 2021 - 2:14pm
 
What is the meaning of this? - Isabeau - Jan 15, 2021 - 2:00pm
 
Climate Change - R_P - Jan 15, 2021 - 12:47pm
 
what the hell, miamizsun? - oldviolin - Jan 15, 2021 - 10:20am
 
What the hell OV? - miamizsun - Jan 15, 2021 - 9:51am
 
Physics questions - oldviolin - Jan 15, 2021 - 8:56am
 
Classical Music - rhahl - Jan 15, 2021 - 6:48am
 
Capitalism and Consumerism... now what? - miamizsun - Jan 15, 2021 - 6:10am
 
RightWingNutZ - Red_Dragon - Jan 15, 2021 - 5:55am
 
Back to the 10's - rhahl - Jan 15, 2021 - 5:37am
 
Museum Of Bad Album Covers - Proclivities - Jan 15, 2021 - 4:58am
 
Twitter's finest moment - Jiggz - Jan 15, 2021 - 1:28am
 
Country Up The Bumpkin - oldviolin - Jan 14, 2021 - 8:14pm
 
What The Hell Buddy? - oldviolin - Jan 14, 2021 - 8:09pm
 
In My Room - oldviolin - Jan 14, 2021 - 7:58pm
 
Looting & vandalism isn't protest - R_P - Jan 14, 2021 - 5:25pm
 
Insane-looking Lawyers - rhahl - Jan 14, 2021 - 4:14pm
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - KurtfromLaQuinta - Jan 14, 2021 - 2:54pm
 
Joe Biden - black321 - Jan 14, 2021 - 2:07pm
 
Race in America - sirdroseph - Jan 14, 2021 - 12:32pm
 
New Music - R_P - Jan 14, 2021 - 12:11pm
 
hallucinogenic drugs - sirdroseph - Jan 14, 2021 - 11:09am
 
Back to the 90's - rgio - Jan 14, 2021 - 7:47am
 
Concept Albums - oldviolin - Jan 14, 2021 - 7:34am
 
Democratic Party - kurtster - Jan 14, 2021 - 6:17am
 
Capital Punishment - R_P - Jan 13, 2021 - 8:54pm
 
Biden Crime Family - westslope - Jan 13, 2021 - 6:59pm
 
2 questions. - miamizsun - Jan 13, 2021 - 5:30pm
 
Australia has Disappeared - haresfur - Jan 13, 2021 - 5:12pm
 
Impeachment Time: - R_P - Jan 13, 2021 - 2:49pm
 
Back to the 60's - kcar - Jan 13, 2021 - 2:45pm
 
Oh, The Stupidity - R_P - Jan 13, 2021 - 2:16pm
 
Know your memes - black321 - Jan 13, 2021 - 12:02pm
 
Republican Party - miamizsun - Jan 13, 2021 - 10:53am
 
The Global War on Terror - westslope - Jan 13, 2021 - 9:36am
 
Counting with Pictures - Proclivities - Jan 13, 2021 - 8:11am
 
Great guitar faces - yuel - Jan 13, 2021 - 6:37am
 
DQ (as in 'Daily Quote') - miamizsun - Jan 13, 2021 - 4:41am
 
• • • Poopoo • • • - miamizsun - Jan 13, 2021 - 4:15am
 
Those Lovable Policemen - haresfur - Jan 12, 2021 - 5:26pm
 
The death penalty on trial? - Ohmsen - Jan 12, 2021 - 4:41pm
 
Live Music - Ohmsen - Jan 12, 2021 - 3:39pm
 
Military Matters - Ohmsen - Jan 12, 2021 - 2:00pm
 
Dear Retail Fashion Industry - Ohmsen - Jan 12, 2021 - 1:30pm
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - R_P - Jan 12, 2021 - 10:30am
 
HALF A WORLD - oldviolin - Jan 12, 2021 - 10:22am
 
Net Neutrality - Ohmsen - Jan 12, 2021 - 9:55am
 
FOUR WORDS - Ohmsen - Jan 12, 2021 - 9:43am
 
TWO WORDS - oldviolin - Jan 12, 2021 - 9:40am
 
ONE WORD - oldviolin - Jan 12, 2021 - 9:38am
 
THREE WORDS - oldviolin - Jan 12, 2021 - 9:38am
 
• • • The Once-a-Day • • •  - oldviolin - Jan 12, 2021 - 9:18am
 
The Dragons' Roost - Ohmsen - Jan 12, 2021 - 9:07am
 
Index » Internet/Computer » The Web » Tech & Science Page: Previous  1, 2, 3, ... 191, 192, 193  Next
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miamizsun

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Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
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Posted: Aug 20, 2020 - 6:17am

i'm constantly blown away by what we can achieve

 
Ohmsen

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Posted: Aug 14, 2020 - 3:31pm


R_P

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Posted: Jul 9, 2020 - 12:03pm

The Computer Scientist Who Can’t Stop Telling Stories
For pioneering computer scientist Donald Knuth, good coding is synonymous with beautiful expression.
R_P

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Posted: Jul 2, 2020 - 5:03pm

Inside the Invasive, Secretive “Bossware” Tracking Workers
Steely_D

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Posted: May 25, 2020 - 2:54pm



 rhahl wrote:
https://xkcd.com/1949/
 



Research is ongoing




R_P

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Posted: May 25, 2020 - 2:45pm

Carbon dating, the archaeological workhorse, is getting a major reboot
A long-anticipated recalibration of radiocarbon dating could shift the age of some prehistoric samples hundreds of years
The work combines thousands of data points from tree rings, lake and ocean sediments, corals and stalagmites, among other features, and extends the time frame for radiocarbon dating back to 55,000 years ago — 5,000 years further than the last calibration update in 2013.

miamizsun

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Posted: May 11, 2020 - 2:21pm


miamizsun

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Posted: Apr 17, 2020 - 7:27am

this looks like it is worthy


R_P

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Posted: Apr 14, 2020 - 9:54am

No, senator, science can’t do away with models
Here’s why Senator John Cornyn’s critique of modeling is misguided.
rhahl

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Posted: Apr 2, 2020 - 1:01pm

https://xkcd.com/1949/
NoEnzLefttoSplit

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Posted: Apr 2, 2020 - 8:36am

 haresfur wrote:

 
And that's my problem with the medical profession viewpoint. They, rightly deal with individuals and want to know exactly what is going on with their patients. But statistics are powerful tools for dealing with populations. If we had good data on a sample of people, along with whether they felt they had symptoms and their body temperature, we would have a very good estimate of how many people had been affected.

 
That thought went through my mind too, surely a few samples of the general population would give us at least some indication within certain confidence intervals. At the moment I haven't heard a thing in any country of how many of the general population have already been infected. The video Miami posted today refers to an extrapolation by the Imperial College that infers (based on hard data) that between 2 and 7 % of the European population has already been exposed.  (edit: This is not survey based but a bottom-up calculation from the number of deaths, transmission rates and fatality rates.) That would be fantastic news if true. 

I hope they get the new sero-surveys up and running soon. Might make everyone calm down a bit.
Red_Dragon

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Posted: Apr 2, 2020 - 6:41am

Scientists have found "dense" communities of creatures living deep beneath the sea, in a discovery that gives hope that similar life could be found on Mars.
haresfur

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Location: The Golden Triangle
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 31, 2020 - 2:28pm



 rgio wrote:


 haresfur wrote:


 NoEnzLefttoSplit wrote:

That's an excellent article. 

A mate of mine (health advisor to the UN in Geneva) basically put everything down in a couple of sentences: "The only reliable way to get true estimates of what percentage of a population has been infected is from a population-based sero prevalence study, which gives you the denominator you need to accurately estimate death rates. 

 
 
I disagree with this, if I understand correctly. A random (or as close to random as you can practically get) sample of the population, performed through time would give you a good estimate of the infection rate and how it is changing. Since the rate is high, your sample size doesn't need to be huge to find the infected %. It's hard to estimate one in a million, but not so hard to estimate one in a hundred. 
 
I believe the original suggestion is a test for everyone, not a sample
.  It's impossible to know who's experienced the virus if we didn't allow testing for everyone with symptoms, let alone to the numbers of asymptomatic people that may have antibodies and don't know they have them.

 
And that's my problem with the medical profession viewpoint. They, rightly deal with individuals and want to know exactly what is going on with their patients. But statistics are powerful tools for dealing with populations. If we had good data on a sample of people, along with whether they felt they had symptoms and their body temperature, we would have a very good estimate of how many people had been affected.

rgio

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Location: West Jersey
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 31, 2020 - 1:50pm



 haresfur wrote:


 NoEnzLefttoSplit wrote:

That's an excellent article. 

A mate of mine (health advisor to the UN in Geneva) basically put everything down in a couple of sentences: "The only reliable way to get true estimates of what percentage of a population has been infected is from a population-based sero prevalence study, which gives you the denominator you need to accurately estimate death rates. 

 
 
I disagree with this, if I understand correctly. A random (or as close to random as you can practically get) sample of the population, performed through time would give you a good estimate of the infection rate and how it is changing. Since the rate is high, your sample size doesn't need to be huge to find the infected %. It's hard to estimate one in a million, but not so hard to estimate one in a hundred. 
 
I believe the original suggestion is a test for everyone, not a sample.  It's impossible to know who's experienced the virus if we didn't allow testing for everyone with symptoms, let alone to the numbers of asymptomatic people that may have antibodies and don't know they have them.

haresfur

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Location: The Golden Triangle
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 31, 2020 - 1:41pm



 NoEnzLefttoSplit wrote:

That's an excellent article. 

A mate of mine (health advisor to the UN in Geneva) basically put everything down in a couple of sentences: "The only reliable way to get true estimates of what percentage of a population has been infected is from a population-based sero prevalence study, which gives you the denominator you need to accurately estimate death rates. Given the huge differentials in deaths by age cohorts, you need a huge sample size for your sero-prevalence survey."  


The problem with this is that antibody testing is only just coming on the market AND we need to test vast numbers of people.
What is known, is that a sizeable number of people die from the virus, so letting it rage uncontrolled is not an option at this stage. 

Ergo:  policy should err on the side of caution until we work out an exit strategy.

I am more worried about a second or third peak of the pandemic coming. People's tolerance of social distancing is already wearing thin.. hard to see it lasting the distance, or maybe it just becomes the new normal.

 
 
I disagree with this, if I understand correctly. A random (or as close to random as you can practically get) sample of the population, performed through time would give you a good estimate of the infection rate and how it is changing. Since the rate is high, your sample size doesn't need to be huge to find the infected %. It's hard to estimate one in a million, but not so hard to estimate one in a hundred. That's why they can get away with a poll of only a few thousand people to decide how many people think Trump is a weaponized plum.

good estimate of the infection trends, now, will allow a back estimate of the people who have been infected.

I think I posted about how we have started testing one in five people who present at the hospital for any reason. I'd prefer they go out and test in the community, but even that will give good numbers. Certainly better than we have had.
kurtster

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Location: where fear is not a virtue
Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 31, 2020 - 1:59am

 NoEnzLefttoSplit wrote:


I am more worried about a second or third peak of the pandemic coming. People's tolerance of social distancing is already wearing thin.. hard to see it lasting the distance, or maybe it just becomes the new normal.

 
 
I'm worried about the rebound second wave more than right now myself.  People will get complacent and sloppy again quickly after the first round is on the wane.  They'll think I must be doing things right or I wouldn't still be here and relax, too much.  I don't know what my job will be like when we get back open and start dealing with humans again up close and personal.

Are we as opticians, going to be in masks and gloves indefinitely ?  I would have to be pretty stupid to not wear the stuff.  Handling all of the frames and keeping them sanitary and everyone safe ?  Are people going to keep themselves away when they aren't feeling good for the benefit of others they may come into close contact with ?

It's really going to depend on how fast we get a vaccine up and running.  Right now the only ones who can be even somewhat comfortable at all are the recovered.  Getting there is the problem.  And we still don't know they cannot get reinfected although its a pretty good chance they won't.

Like you were thinking earlier ... about getting deliberately infected.  Our FDA just approved the Chloroquine / Zpack treatments.  I just got out of the hospital and being in the high risk group that i'm in, pretty healthy (for me) and stable at the moment.  Infect myself now before the hospitals get really slammed and be pretty sure of a bed and the stuff needed to get me over the hump ?  There is a real short window of opportunity here before the hospitals around here get maxed out and it'll be luck of the draw of being admitted into a good place with a good chance of walking out upright instead of under a sheet.  Replacement PPE's are about to be restocked, it'll never be a better chance than soon.   I've already had to make that choice once.  Yeah, this is selfish at least and stupid at worst.  But it is what is going through my mind right now.  I'd rather take myself out than get randomly infected by some dummy who still thinks hygiene is a kind of denim pants.  Back in the 90's when I first got into this bidnez, I was working for WalMart.  I dared to refuse to help a young woman with a little kid who had snot literally dripping out of his nose and onto his shirt asking her to please come back another time.  I got "coached" about that ...
NoEnzLefttoSplit

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Gender: Male


Posted: Mar 31, 2020 - 12:29am

 R_P wrote:
The Mathematics of Predicting the Course of the Coronavirus
Epidemiologists are using complex models to help policymakers get ahead of the Covid-19 pandemic. But the leap from equations to decisions is a long one.
 
That's an excellent article. 

A mate of mine (health advisor to the UN in Geneva) basically put everything down in a couple of sentences: "The only reliable way to get true estimates of what percentage of a population has been infected is from a population-based sero prevalence study, which gives you the denominator you need to accurately estimate death rates. Given the huge differentials in deaths by age cohorts, you need a huge sample size for your sero-prevalence survey."  

The problem with this is that antibody testing is only just coming on the market AND we need to test vast numbers of people.
What is known, is that a sizeable number of people die from the virus, so letting it rage uncontrolled is not an option at this stage. 

Ergo:  policy should err on the side of caution until we work out an exit strategy.

I am more worried about a second or third peak of the pandemic coming. People's tolerance of social distancing is already wearing thin.. hard to see it lasting the distance, or maybe it just becomes the new normal.

 
R_P

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Posted: Mar 30, 2020 - 9:41pm

The Mathematics of Predicting the Course of the Coronavirus
Epidemiologists are using complex models to help policymakers get ahead of the Covid-19 pandemic. But the leap from equations to decisions is a long one.
In the past few days, New York City’s hospitals have become unrecognizable. Thousands of patients sick with the novel coronavirus have swarmed into emergency rooms and intensive care units. From 3,000 miles away in Seattle, as Lisa Brandenburg watched the scenes unfold—isolation wards cobbled together in lobbies, nurses caring for Covid-19 patients in makeshift trash bag gowns, refrigerated mobile morgues idling on the street outside—she couldn’t stop herself from thinking: “That could be us.”

It could be, if the models are wrong.

Until this past week, Seattle had been the center of the Covid-19 pandemic in the United States. It’s where US health officials confirmed the nation’s first case, back in January, and its first death a month later. As president of the University of Washington Medicine Hospitals and Clinics, Brandenburg oversees the region’s largest health network, which treats more than half a million patients every year. In early March, she and many public health authorities were shaken by an urgent report produced by computational biologists at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Their analysis of genetic data indicated the virus had been silently circulating in the Seattle area for weeks and had already infected at least 500 to 600 people. The city was a ticking time bomb.

The mayor of Seattle declared a civil emergency. Superintendents started closing schools. King and Snohomish counties banned gatherings of more than 250 people. The Space Needle went dark. Seattleites wondered if they should be doing more, and they petitioned the governor to issue a statewide shelter-at-home order. But Brandenburg was left with a much grimmer set of questions: How many people are going to get hospitalized? How many of them will require critical care? When will they start showing up? Will we have enough ventilators when they do?

There’s no way to know those answers for sure. But hospital administrators like Brandenburg have to hazard an educated guess. That’s the only way they can try to buy enough ventilators and hire enough ICU nurses and clear out enough hospital beds to be ready for a wave of hacking, gasping, suffocating Covid-19 patients.

That’s where Chris Murray and his computer simulations come in. (...)

R_P

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Posted: Mar 26, 2020 - 11:12am


dischuckin

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Location: dry shippys wa
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 20, 2020 - 12:02pm

https://scitechdaily.com/new-i...
Quote:

Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have developed a device that uses a natural protein to create electricity from moisture in the air, a new technology they say could have significant implications for the future of renewable energy, climate change and in the future of medicine.

As reported today in Nature, the laboratories of electrical engineer Jun Yao and microbiologist Derek Lovley at UMass Amherst have created a device they call an “Air-gen.” or air-powered generator, with electrically conductive protein nanowires produced by the microbe Geobacter. The Air-gen connects electrodes to the protein nanowires in such a way that electrical current is generated from the water vapor naturally present in the atmosphere.

“We are literally making electricity out of thin air,” says Yao. “The Air-gen generates clean energy 24/7.” Lovely, who has advanced sustainable biology-based electronic materials over three decades, adds, “It’s the most amazing and exciting application of protein nanowires yet.”

...
The Air-gen discovery reflects an unusual interdisciplinary collaboration, they say. Lovley discovered the Geobacter microbe in the mud of the Potomac River more than 30 years ago. His lab later discovered its ability to produce electrically conductive protein nanowires. Before coming to UMass Amherst, Yao had worked for years at Harvard University, where he engineered electronic devices with silicon nanowires. They joined forces to see if useful electronic devices could be made with the protein nanowires harvested from Geobacter.

Xiaomeng Liu, a Ph.D. student in Yao’s lab, was developing sensor devices when he noticed something unexpected. He recalls, “I saw that when the nanowires were contacted with electrodes in a specific way the devices generated a current. I found that that exposure to atmospheric humidity was essential and that protein nanowires adsorbed water, producing a voltage gradient across the device.”

In addition to the Air-gen, Yao’s laboratory has developed several other applications with the protein nanowires. “This is just the beginning of new era of protein-based electronic devices” said Yao.

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