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Otis Redding — These Arms of Mine
Album: I've Been Loving You Too Long
Avg rating:
8.2

Your rating:
Total ratings: 374









Released: 1965
Length: 2:28
Plays (last 30 days): 0
These arms of mine
They are lonely, lonely and feeling blue
These arms of mine
They are yearning, yearning from wanting you

And if you would let them hold you
Oh, how grateful I will be
These arms of mine
They are burning, burning from wanting you
These arms of mine
They are wanting, wanting to hold you

And if you would let them hold you
Oh, how grateful I will be
Come on, come on baby
Just be my little woman, just be my lover
I need me somebody, somebody to treat me right
I need your loving arms,
Loving arms to hold me tight
And I need your tender lips
Comments (33)add comment
Long Live                                                                                                                                  Radio Paradise
                                                                                                                                                    8 - Most Excellent


                                         
                                          N O B O D Y
                                         sang like Otis.

                         25 years old at Monterey - June,18th 1967:

                         https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7jbMLNoyjM

                         Gone 6 months later at 26

 
GODLIKE  : )
 K_Love wrote:
How on Earth is this not a 10?!?

 


lots of Otis here lately{#Laughing}
he's got a great catalog 
THE BIG "O"



"hurry oldfart, into the WABAC machine!"
 oldfart48 wrote:
back when Ben Franklin made wax recording a reality. 3 minutes more or less was the most a single wax cylinder would hold. songwriters got that timing down and the rest is history. you can thank the 60's &70's jam bands who helped create modern rock  fm radio for longer cuts. (it's also where that ol' saw " stacks of wax" came from
 
Ben Franklin = Thomas Edison?
This was a week where I needed someone's Arms ...
 oldfart48 wrote:
back when Ben Franklin made wax recording a reality. 3 minutes more or less was the most a single wax cylinder would hold. songwriters got that timing down and the rest is history. you can thank the 60's &70's jam bands who helped create modern rock  fm radio for longer cuts. (it's also where that ol' saw " stacks of wax" came from
 
Ben Franklin?! 
 socalhol wrote:
I've often noticed that these songs from an older era seem to all be fairly short in duration, at least as compared to the average length of newer songs.  Seems more noticeable when mixed in the middle of modern songs.  Anyone know why this is?  Did they have a limit to how long songs could be to fit the commercial radio programming back then?

  back when Ben Franklin made wax recording a reality. 3 minutes more or less was the most a single wax cylinder would hold. songwriters got that timing down and the rest is history. you can thank the 60's &70's jam bands who helped create modern rock  fm radio for longer cuts. (it's also where that ol' saw " stacks of wax" came from



 Antigone wrote:
Seems to fade out too soon.

 
He certainly did.  Amazing musician, taken from us too soon.
Seems to fade out too soon.
I ride by his statue in Macon about three times per week.  Really nice family in town.  One singing dude and a town with great music legacy.

Ben Johnston (composer)Bill Berry, member of R.E.M. band; lived in Macon in early 1970sBuddy Greene, singer, songwriter, guitar player and harmonica player ;gospel music, with a distinctly Southern flavor.Chuck Leavell, Allman Brothers/Rolling Stones pianistClaudine Clark, R&B musician/composerEmmett Millerminstrel show singer noted for a yodel-like falsetto voiceHoward Tate, soul singer and songwriterJason Aldeancountry music singerJerry Jemmottsoul bassistLittle Richard Penniman, singer, songwriter, and pianist; pioneer of rock and rollLucille Hegamin, singer, entertainer, and a pioneer African American blues music recording artistMark Heard, record producer, folk-rock singer, and songwriterMike Mills, member of R.E.M. band. Lived in Macon in early 1960-1970sOtis Reddingsoul musicianPhil Walden, record producer and music businessmanRandy Crawford, jazz and R&B singerRobert McDuffie, violinistRosa King, jazz/blues saxophonist/singerTex James, rapper with Young Mogul Entertainment who has collaborated with B.o.B. and Stuey RockThe Allman Brothers, Southern rock bandYoung Jeezy, rapper 
More Redding :) Please, more.. {#Pray}
1.4% gave this a 1?  wtf?   a true 10!
 
How on Earth is this not a 10?!?
 LizK wrote:

Yes
Yes
And Yes 
 
So great to hear this again-just goes to show the depth of musical prowess these two possess. And if you want a really great live performance of this, check out Otis Live in Europe-killer, especially "Try A Little Tenderness"—this got us ramped up on a Friday evening after classes-we were raging love monkeys!
 
Otis, my man, why did you have to die so young?
 kingart wrote:
I don't believe I've ever heard this before. 
Great singer, gone way too early.
Thanks, Bill and RP.

 
 
Yes
Yes
And Yes 
I don't believe I've ever heard this before. 
Great singer, gone way too early.
Thanks, Bill and RP.

 
 socalhol wrote:
I've often noticed that these songs from an older era seem to all be fairly short in duration, at least as compared to the average length of newer songs.  Seems more noticeable when mixed in the middle of modern songs.  Anyone know why this is?  Did they have a limit to how long songs could be to fit the commercial radio programming back then?
 
songs for AM radio were usually about 3 minutes long.

I've often noticed that these songs from an older era seem to all be fairly short in duration, at least as compared to the average length of newer songs.  Seems more noticeable when mixed in the middle of modern songs.  Anyone know why this is?  Did they have a limit to how long songs could be to fit the commercial radio programming back then?
like to hear this on a heavier rotation.
Awesome, I was just listening to this earlier today!
 2cats wrote:
This is so good for the ears.
 
'Tuma?

Jes' funnin' ya.

Otis Redding could sing a phone book, and the audience would be in tears. So perfect.

This would be an ideal slow dance song. {#Cool}
Finally figured out who Amos Lee sounds like: Otis Redding!
So I had a girlfriend that I called her house.
 She was not home and I got the message machine.
 I hung up, called back and left this on the machine.

  She is now my wife for the last 16 years, somethings just work
10!  LOVE LOVE LOVE Otis!!!  every song from him is a treasure.
This is so good for the ears.
First?