[ ]   [ ]   [ ]                        [ ]      [ ]   [ ]

Why are 2 of the best albums of the last decade completel... - KurtfromLaQuinta - Jul 6, 2020 - 1:55pm
 
The Obituary Page - KurtfromLaQuinta - Jul 6, 2020 - 1:43pm
 
What The Hell Buddy? - KurtfromLaQuinta - Jul 6, 2020 - 1:31pm
 
Trump - R_P - Jul 6, 2020 - 1:05pm
 
Looting & vandalism isn't protest - R_P - Jul 6, 2020 - 12:14pm
 
Country Up The Bumpkin - oldviolin - Jul 6, 2020 - 11:58am
 
COVID-19 - Proclivities - Jul 6, 2020 - 11:57am
 
The All-Things Beatles Forum - Steely_D - Jul 6, 2020 - 11:04am
 
Name My Band - oldviolin - Jul 6, 2020 - 10:50am
 
The Electoral College - ScottFromWyoming - Jul 6, 2020 - 10:36am
 
Things You Thought Today - Coaxial - Jul 6, 2020 - 9:15am
 
Today in History - Red_Dragon - Jul 6, 2020 - 8:59am
 
Talk Behind Their Backs Forum - VV - Jul 6, 2020 - 8:55am
 
Trump Lies - Bultaco - Jul 6, 2020 - 7:50am
 
The List of Reasons Why Schlabby Hates People - sunybuny - Jul 6, 2020 - 7:47am
 
Florida - Coaxial - Jul 6, 2020 - 6:09am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - Coaxial - Jul 6, 2020 - 5:58am
 
What Are You Going To Do Today? - miamizsun - Jul 6, 2020 - 5:44am
 
Baseball, anyone? - haresfur - Jul 5, 2020 - 8:08pm
 
Great Old Songs You Rarely Hear Anymore - buddy - Jul 5, 2020 - 7:06pm
 
Live Music - buddy - Jul 5, 2020 - 6:59pm
 
Outstanding Covers - buddy - Jul 5, 2020 - 6:51pm
 
2020 Elections - KarmaKarma - Jul 5, 2020 - 5:36pm
 
Gardeners Corner - kctomato - Jul 5, 2020 - 3:24pm
 
Race in America - R_P - Jul 5, 2020 - 2:35pm
 
YouTube: Music-Videos - R_P - Jul 5, 2020 - 1:30pm
 
• • • The Once-a-Day • • •  - Steely_D - Jul 5, 2020 - 12:35pm
 
Movie Quote - rhahl - Jul 5, 2020 - 12:03pm
 
Lyrics That Remind You of Someone - oldviolin - Jul 5, 2020 - 11:53am
 
Questions. - oldviolin - Jul 5, 2020 - 9:56am
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - Red_Dragon - Jul 5, 2020 - 8:50am
 
Favorite Quotes - oldviolin - Jul 5, 2020 - 8:45am
 
Strips, cartoons, illustrations - R_P - Jul 4, 2020 - 10:27pm
 
Ask the Libertarian - kcar - Jul 4, 2020 - 9:55pm
 
All Dogs Go To Heaven - Dog Pix - KarmaKarma - Jul 4, 2020 - 9:14pm
 
Dialing 1-800-Manbird - oldviolin - Jul 4, 2020 - 6:40pm
 
Mixtape Culture Club - Lazy8 - Jul 4, 2020 - 2:13pm
 
Counting with Pictures - ScottN - Jul 4, 2020 - 12:58pm
 
In My Room - Coaxial - Jul 4, 2020 - 12:26pm
 
RP Daily Trivia Challenge - BlueHeronDruid - Jul 4, 2020 - 12:37am
 
RP stops playing after a few minutes on iPod (iOS) - gtufano - Jul 3, 2020 - 11:33pm
 
New Music - R_P - Jul 3, 2020 - 6:50pm
 
Canada - westslope - Jul 3, 2020 - 3:38pm
 
how do you feel right now? - miamizsun - Jul 3, 2020 - 1:54pm
 
US Empire - R_P - Jul 3, 2020 - 12:46pm
 
• • • PUZZLES • • • - BlueHeronDruid - Jul 3, 2020 - 10:02am
 
• • • Things Magicians Exclaim • • •  - oldviolin - Jul 3, 2020 - 8:20am
 
Bluos App and Vault 2 Streamer. Is it playing in Flac? - BillG - Jul 3, 2020 - 8:05am
 
• • • BRING OUT YOUR DEAD • • •  - oldviolin - Jul 3, 2020 - 8:04am
 
::odd but intriguing:: - oldviolin - Jul 3, 2020 - 8:01am
 
• • • Things Musicians Exclaim • • • - - oldviolin - Jul 3, 2020 - 7:46am
 
What the hell OV? - oldviolin - Jul 3, 2020 - 7:43am
 
How are you coping/dealing with the crisis? - kurtster - Jul 3, 2020 - 2:44am
 
Oh, The Stupidity - haresfur - Jul 3, 2020 - 2:40am
 
NASA & other news from space - R_P - Jul 2, 2020 - 7:45pm
 
What are you listening to now? - black321 - Jul 2, 2020 - 7:14pm
 
Anti-War - R_P - Jul 2, 2020 - 6:04pm
 
Vinyl for old timer - Steely_D - Jul 2, 2020 - 6:00pm
 
Tech & Science - R_P - Jul 2, 2020 - 5:03pm
 
Now that is a great story! - miamizsun - Jul 2, 2020 - 4:14pm
 
260,000 Posts in one thread? - miamizsun - Jul 2, 2020 - 4:12pm
 
Watch Now ! - miamizsun - Jul 2, 2020 - 4:06pm
 
Automotive Lust - Red_Dragon - Jul 2, 2020 - 1:53pm
 
Less Tori and more anything else ;p - hellojofo - Jul 2, 2020 - 10:13am
 
sonos service - mjvander - Jul 2, 2020 - 8:53am
 
Supreme Court Rulings - Red_Dragon - Jul 2, 2020 - 8:02am
 
Derplahoma Questions and Points of Interest - Isabeau - Jul 2, 2020 - 7:47am
 
Hey Baby, It's The 4th O' July - miamizsun - Jul 2, 2020 - 6:57am
 
Amazon Echo/Alexa stream not working - rochesimpson - Jul 1, 2020 - 3:31pm
 
Official date for our 20th Anniversary? - Windspirit - Jul 1, 2020 - 3:16pm
 
Republican Party - Red_Dragon - Jul 1, 2020 - 11:40am
 
Can't add RP service to Sonos - donot_spam - Jul 1, 2020 - 10:28am
 
Fox Spews - kurtster - Jun 30, 2020 - 9:21pm
 
Vinyl Only Spin List - kurtster - Jun 30, 2020 - 8:47pm
 
Those Lovable Policemen - R_P - Jun 30, 2020 - 8:44pm
 
Index » Radio Paradise/General » General Discussion » Other Medical Stuff Page: Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 44, 45, 46, 47, 48  Next
Post to this Topic
(former member)

(former member) Avatar

Location: hotel in Las Vegas
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 10, 2009 - 9:22pm



Here's a list of inexpensive, over-the-counter skin care products... and I'm talkin' over-the-counter, as in drug store, not as in Saks Fifth Avenue... these reasonably priced products work just as well as their designer counterparts...

For Face
Cleansers:
- Moisturel sensitive skin cleanser (the one I love for winter dryness)
- Purpose liquid or bar (I use the liquid in summer)
- Cetaphil bar or liquid (really burned my eyes)
- Basis liquid cleaner for sensitive skin
- Oil of Olay fragrance free cleanser
- Eucerin gentle hydrating cleanser

Moisturizers for Face-Daytime-SPF:
- Purpose dual treatment
- DML for face
- Eucerin 25
- Ombrelle 15
- Oil of Olay for sensitive skin
- Not on list, because it's newer than list, but I use and love Neutrogena Healthy Skin Face Lotion, with SPF 15

Nighttime
- Oil of Olay daily renewal
- Complex 15 for face
- Eucerin Q10
- Kinerase cream or lotion (twice a day)

For Body
Moisturizers
- SBR lipo cream (great for flakey patches)
- Moisterel lotion
- DML forte
- Eucerin Plus
- Aguaglycolic lotion ($15 might be high for a drug store product, but this stuff works as well as designer brands. Caution, as with all glycolic acid formulas, don't use this after shaving. I also use the face cream version)
- Cetaphil moisturizing lotion or cream (I also use this)

Body Soaps (bar)
- Lever 2000 unscented (used to use, now unfortunately I'm in love with a French soap at $8.50 a bar)
- Dove unscented
- Cetaphil bar
- Dial sensitive skin

Body Soaps (liquid)
- Oil of Olay daily renewal
- Dove

Sun Blocks
- Solbar AVO
- Pre-sun Ultra 30 lotion or gel
- Ombrelle 15, 30 (my choice)
- Vanicream SPF 15 or 35




musik_knut

musik_knut Avatar

Location: Third Stone From The Sun
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 10, 2009 - 5:48pm

More Americans obese than merely overweight
Latest statistics show numbers have flipped and now 34 percent are obese

updated 6:33 p.m. ET, Fri., Jan. 9, 2009
WASHINGTON - The number of obese American adults outweighs the number of those who are merely overweight, according to the latest statistics from the federal government.

Numbers posted by the National Center for Health Statistics show that more than 34 percent of Americans are obese, compared to 32.7 percent who are overweight. It said just under 6 percent are "extremely" obese.

"More than one-third of adults, or over 72 million people, were obese in 2005-2006, the NCHS said in its report.
The numbers are based on a survey of 4,356 adults over the age of 20 who take part in a regular government survey of health, said the NCHS, which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The figures come from the 2005-2006 survey and are the most current available.

"During the physical examination, conducted in mobile examination centers, height and weight were measured as part of a more comprehensive set of body measurements," the NCHS report said.

"Although the prevalence of obesity has more than doubled since 1980, the prevalence of overweight has remained stable over the same time period," it said.
Obesity raises serious health risks
Obesity and overweight are calculated using a formula called body mass index. BMI is equal to weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared. Someone with a BMI of 25 to 29 is classified as overweight, 30 to 40 counts as obese and people with BMIs of 40 or more are morbidly obese.

In the 1988-1994 surveys, 33 percent of Americans were overweight, 22.9 percent were obese and 2.9 percent were morbidly obese. The numbers have edged up steadily since.

Being overweight or obese raises the risk of heart disease, diabetes, some cancers, arthritis and other conditions.

In May, the CDC reported that 32 percent of U.S. children fit the definition of being overweight, 16 percent were obese and 11 percent were extremely obese.

Childhood and adult obesity has emerged as a growing problem not only in the United States but also in many countries around the world.


musik_knut

musik_knut Avatar

Location: Third Stone From The Sun
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 9, 2009 - 8:48pm

 romeotuma wrote: 

thanks Mr. Zappa!
musik_knut

musik_knut Avatar

Location: Third Stone From The Sun
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 9, 2009 - 8:42pm

 JrzyTmata wrote:
damn, we're out of peanut butter

 

'so k...I have some...just scrape off the funky stuff on top...
JrzyTmata

JrzyTmata Avatar



Posted: Jan 9, 2009 - 8:40pm

damn, we're out of peanut butter
musik_knut

musik_knut Avatar

Location: Third Stone From The Sun
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 9, 2009 - 8:37pm

 romeotuma wrote:


This was just released about an hour ago, folks... if you haven't heard, there is a salmonella outbreak in 42 states right now—

Salmonella outbreak linked to peanut butter
Fri Jan 9, 2009 9:52pm EST
By Maggie Fox

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Minnesota health officials issued a product alert for peanut butter on Friday after finding a jar that was contaminated with a strain of salmonella linked to an outbreak across the United States.  While the bacteria in the peanut butter match the outbreak strain genetically, the health officials said it was not clear yet that the peanut butter could be linked to any cases.

The outbreak of salmonella food poisoning has sickened at least 399 people and put 70 or more into hospital since September.  Officials from Minnesota's departments of agriculture and health said they were issuing a product advisory for King Nut brand creamy peanut butter after finding the Salmonella typhimurium bacteria in a big institutional-size jar.

"The Minnesota cases have the same genetic fingerprint as the cases in a national outbreak that has sickened almost 400 people in 42 states," the health department said in a statement.

It said the product was distributed in Minnesota to places such as long-term care facilities, hospitals, schools, universities, restaurants, cafeterias and bakeries.

"At this time, the product is not known to be distributed for retail sale in grocery stores," it said. "State officials are urging establishments who may have the product on hand to avoid serving it, pending further instructions as the investigation progresses."

Earlier on Friday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention listed the numbers of cases in each of the 42 affected states. California was hardest hit with 55 cases, while Ohio had 53 and Minnesota had 30.

An outbreak of salmonella was linked to Peter Pan brand peanut butter in 2007. ConAgra Foods Inc closed a Georgia plant after more than 300 people became ill in that outbreak.  The CDC is trying to trace the source of the outbreak, which began in September. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, state health officials and the Food and Drug Administration are also involved.

Tracking the source of such an outbreak can be tricky. The CDC said poultry, cheese and eggs are the most common source of Salmonella typhimurium strains.  Every year, about 40,000 people are reported ill with salmonella in the United States, the CDC says, but many more cases are never reported.  There have been several high-profile outbreaks of foodborne illness in the United States, including a strain of salmonella carried by peppers from Mexico that sickened 1,400 people from April to August 2007 and an E. coli epidemic in 2006, traced to California spinach, that killed three people.



 

romeo,
Thanks for posting this update...as a microbiologist/molecular biologist, this is stuff I follow...

mk...
(former member)

(former member) Avatar

Location: hotel in Las Vegas
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 1, 2009 - 8:51am



Troubled not just at night, insomniacs may be in a "state of hyperarousal" because they don't have an adequate supply of a certain inhibitory neurotransmitter, according to new research...

Insomnia Tied to Lack of Brain Chemical


Beanie

Beanie Avatar

Location: under the jellicle moon
Gender: Female


Posted: Dec 31, 2008 - 7:34am

Who the heck named this thread?  "Other Medical Stuff"?  As in, "Things That Are Not, Cancer, Autism, or Women's Issues, and Don't Neccessarily Make You Go Wow"? 



Edit:  Oh, you named it, HC.    Sorry. 

But still....  
hippiechick

hippiechick Avatar

Location: topsy turvy land
Gender: Female


Posted: Dec 31, 2008 - 7:31am

No Mug? Drug Makers Cut Out Goodies for Doctors

To Lehman Brothers, Linens ’n Things and the blank VHS tape, add another American institution that expired in 2008: drug company trinkets.

Starting Jan. 1, the pharmaceutical industry has agreed to a voluntary moratorium on the kind of branded goodies — Viagra pens, Zoloft soap dispensers, Lipitor mugs — that were meant to foster good will and, some would say, encourage doctors to prescribe more of the drugs.

No longer will Merck furnish doctors with purplish adhesive bandages advertising Gardasil, a vaccine against the human papillomavirus. Banished, too, are black T-shirts from Allergan adorned with rhinestones that spell out B-O-T-O-X. So are pens advertising the Sepracor sleep drug Lunesta, in whose barrel floats the brand’s mascot, a somnolent moth.

Some skeptics deride the voluntary ban as a superficial measure that does nothing to curb the far larger amounts drug companies spend each year on various other efforts to influence physicians. But proponents welcome it as a step toward ending the barrage of drug brands and logos that surround, and may subliminally influence, doctors and patients.

“It’s not just the pens — it’s the paper on the exam table, the tongue depressor, the stethoscope tags, medical calipers that might be used to interpret an EKG, penlights,” said Dr. Robert Goodman, a physician in internal medicine at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx.

In 1999, Dr. Goodman started No Free Lunch, a nonprofit group that encourages doctors to reject drug company giveaways. “Practically anything you can put a name on is branded in a doctor’s office, short of branding, like a Nascar driver, on the doctor’s white coat,” Dr. Goodman said.

The new voluntary industry guidelines try to counter the impression that gifts to doctors are intended to unduly influence medicine. The code, drawn up by Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, an industry group in Washington, bars drug companies from giving doctors branded pens, staplers, flash drives, paperweights, calculators and the like.

The guidelines also reiterate the group’s 2002 code, which prohibited more expensive goods and services like tickets to professional sports games and junkets to resorts. And it asks companies that finance medical courses, conferences or scholarships to leave the selection of study material and scholarship recipients to outside program coordinators.

Diane Bieri, the executive vice president of Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, said the updated guidelines were not an admission that gifts could influence doctors’ prescribing habits. Instead, she said, they were meant to emphasize the educational nature of the relationship between industry and doctors.

“We have never said and would never say that a pharmaceutical pen or notebook has influenced any prescription,” Ms. Bieri said.

But some critics said the code did not go far enough to address the influence of drug marketing on the practice of medicine. The guidelines, for example, still permit drug makers to underwrite free lunches for doctors and their staffs or to sponsor dinners for doctors at restaurants, as long as the meals are accompanied by educational presentations.

“Pens or no pens, their influence is not going to be diminished,” said Dr. Larry M. Greenbaum, a rheumatologist in Greenwood, Ind. He has made a point of collecting ballpoint pens advertising formerly heavily promoted medications, like the painkiller Vioxx, that were later withdrawn after reports of dangerous side effects.

Last year, besides giving away nearly $16 billion in free drug samples to doctors, pharmaceutical companies spent more than $6 billion on “detailing” — an industry term for the sales activities of drug representatives including office visits to doctors, meal-time presentations and branded pens and other handouts, according to IMS Health, a health care information company.

The industry code also permits drug makers to pay doctors as consultants “based on fair market value” — which critics say means that companies can continue to pay individual doctors tens of thousands of dollars or more a year.

“We have arrived at a point in the history of medicine in America where doctors have deep, deep financial ties with the drug makers and marketers,” said Allan Coukell, the director of policy for the Prescription Project, a nonprofit group in Boston working to promote evidence-based medicine. “Financial entanglements at all the levels have the potential to influence prescribing in a way that is not good.”

About 40 drug makers, including Eli Lilly & Company, Johnson & Johnson and Pfizer, have signed on to the code. Representatives of several pharmaceutical makers said their companies intended to comply with the guidelines, but they declined to discuss past marketing programs involving branded gifts.

The restrictions come as a blow to the makers and distributors of promotional products, an industry with an annual turnover of about $19 billion, according to Promotional Products Association International, a trade group. Such companies, accustomed to orders of up to a million pens a drug, stand to lose around $1 billion a year in sales as a result of the drug industry’s voluntary ban, the group said.

The sudden scarcity of free goodies, though, could enhance the cachet of collections that some doctors have assembled over the years as a mocking countermeasure to drug marketing. Dr. Nathan Anderson, a resident in internal medicine at a hospital in Texas, has posted photographs of the various items he has received on his blog, drugreptoys.blogspot.com.

Dr. Jeffrey F. Caren, a cardiologist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, has collected more than 1,200 pens and mounted them on a pillar in his office.

While some doctors applaud the gift ban, others seem offended by the insinuation that a ballpoint pen could turn their heads. “It seems goofy to us; we like getting our pens,” Dr. Susan B. Hurson, an obstetrician and gynecologist in Washington, said in a telephone interview.

Dr. Hurson said she paid no attention to the logos on the pens she carries around in her doctor’s coat.

Prompted by a reporter’s question, she pulled out a handful of pens from her pocket and read off the drugs advertised: Clindesse, a cream for vaginal infection; Halo, a system for detecting breast cancer, and Evamist, an estrogen spray. “It’s hard for me to believe it influences what you prescribe.”

But Dr. Phillip Freeman, a psychiatrist in Boston, said that physicians who contended that the giveaways were benign might be suffering from denial.

“The need to deny influence is damaging to the soul,” Dr. Freeman said. He suggested that doctors would feel less conflicted if they simply wore drug company patches on their white coats.

Inamorato

Inamorato Avatar

Location: Twin Cities
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 20, 2008 - 7:15am

The year in weird science and myth-busting

Researchers debunk conventional wisdom about poinsettias, sugar and holiday suicides — and note that Coca-Cola can only do so much.


By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times

Contrary to popular belief, poinsettias are not toxic to people or animals, suicides do not increase over the Christmas holidays, and sugar does not make kids hyperactive. Also, Wales winning the rugby grand slam does not influence the death of popes, and douching with Coca-Cola is not an effective contraceptive method.

Those are some of the conclusions of reports in the British Medical Journal's annual Christmas issue, a compilation of the weird and lighthearted papers its editors accumulate over the year. In a related vein, a report in the journal Lancet details the curious case of a woman who fainted every time she ate a sandwich.

The supposed toxicity of poinsettias has been a subject of warnings ever since the red and white flowers have been associated with the Christmas holiday, but numerous reports from poison control centers do not support the warnings, according to Drs. Rachel C. Vreeman and Aaron E. Carroll of the Indiana University School of Medicine. 

They reviewed nearly 900 calls to such centers reporting poinsettia consumption and found that none of the incidents resulted in serious illness and few produced any symptoms at all. Moreover, experiments with animals show no effects even at very high consumption, they found.

Similarly, researchers reviewed data on suicides in the United States for the last 35 years and found no increase before, during or after the holidays. In fact, despite widespread talk about winter gloom's effects on humans, they found that suicides peak in the summer and are lowest in winter. They conclude that people actually receive additional emotional and social support during the holidays, which decreases suicidal thoughts.

Other common beliefs are also not supported by fact, they said. Studies showed that children who consume large amounts of sugar are no more hyperactive than those who don't. But parents who think their kids have eaten sugar, even when they haven't, tend to rate them as being hyperactive. 

The ill-mannered behavior, the authors wrote, was "all in the parents' minds."

Other myths that have been disproved: Not wearing a hat causes one to lose excessive body heat, and eating at night makes you more likely to pack on the pounds. Also, they found, there is no consistently effective cure for a hangover.

Coca-Cola douches for pregnancy prevention were a part of folklore in the 1950s and 1960s, before the contraceptive pill. People thought that the acidity of the soda would kill sperm and that the classic Coke bottle provided a convenient "shake and shoot" applicator.

Dr. Deborah Anderson of Boston University School of Medicine had previously reported that Coke can impede the mobility of sperm in a test tube. But further study, she said, shows that sperm get to the cervical canal so quickly that postcoital spritzing is ineffective.


For it to work, she wrote, the soda would have to be put in the vagina before sex, "but that would undoubtedly be messy."

(Full story)

 

If I had known that in high school, it would have spared my girlfriend the ludicrous experience of climbing into a laundry room basin with a soda bottle following a broken condom episode!   {#Lol}


jadewahoo

jadewahoo Avatar

Location: Puerto Viejo, Costa Rica
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 18, 2008 - 10:13am

 hippiechick wrote:

Male circumcision lowers cervical cancer risk: study


By Maggie Fox, Health
and Science Editor
Posted 2008/12/17 at 4:41 pm EST

WASHINGTON, Dec. 17, 2008 (Reuters) — Three studies published on Wednesday add to evidence that circumcision can protect men from the deadly AIDS virus and the sexually transmitted virus that causes cervical cancer.

 
Oh, yeah... let's find new ways to justify male genital mutilation. Real smart. The transmission of both of these aforementioned diseases are preventable by the use of condoms.


hippiechick

hippiechick Avatar

Location: topsy turvy land
Gender: Female


Posted: Dec 18, 2008 - 9:52am

 romeotuma wrote:


That's a relief...

 
The trend is to not have your baby boys circumcised, so here is a case for doing so.

hippiechick

hippiechick Avatar

Location: topsy turvy land
Gender: Female


Posted: Dec 18, 2008 - 8:21am

Male circumcision lowers cervical cancer risk: study


By Maggie Fox, Health
and Science Editor
Posted 2008/12/17 at 4:41 pm EST

WASHINGTON, Dec. 17, 2008 (Reuters) — Three studies published on Wednesday add to evidence that circumcision can protect men from the deadly AIDS virus and the sexually transmitted virus that causes cervical cancer.

A boy cries during circumcision at Beni Messous Hospital in Algiers in this file photo from September 26, 2008. Circumcision is compulsory for Muslim boys under the Sharia law (Islamic Law). REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Related Topics

The reports in the Journal of Infectious Diseases are likely to add to the debate over whether men — and newborn boys — should be circumcised to protect their health and perhaps the health of their future sexual partners.

Dr. Bertran Auvert of the University of Versailles in France and colleagues in South Africa tested more than 1,200 men visiting a clinic in South Africa,

They found under 15 percent of the circumcised men and 22 percent of the uncircumcised men were infected with the human papilloma virus, or HPV, which is the main cause of cervical cancer and genital warts.

"This finding explains why women with circumcised partners are at a lower risk of cervical cancer than other women," they wrote in their report.

A second paper looking at U.S. men had less clear-cut results, but Carrie Nielson of Oregon Health & Science University and colleagues said they found some indication that circumcision might protect men.

The circumcised men were about half as likely to have HPV as uncircumcised men, after adjustment for other differences between the two groups.

PREVENTING AIDS

In the third report, Lee Warner of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and colleagues tested African-American men in Baltimore and found 10 percent of those at high risk of infection with HIV who were circumcised had the virus, compared to 22 percent of those who were not.

"Circumcision was associated with substantially reduced HIV risk in patients with known HIV exposure, suggesting that results of other studies demonstrating reduced HIV risk for circumcision among heterosexual men likely can be generalized to the U.S. context," they wrote.

Studies supporting circumcision to reduce HIV transmission had all been done in Africa and U.S. studies were less clear.

Dr. Ronald Gray of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and colleagues said they found the reports encouraging.

"In the United States, circumcision is less common among African American and Hispanic men, who are also the subgroups most at risk of HIV," they wrote in a commentary.

"Thus, circumcision may afford an additional means of protection from HIV in these at-risk minorities."

But they noted that the American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommend routine circumcision for newborns.

"As a consequence of this AAP decision, Medicaid does not cover circumcision costs, and this is particularly disadvantageous for poorer African American and Hispanic boys who, as adults, may face high HIV exposure risk," Gray and colleagues wrote.

"It is also noteworthy that circumcision rates have been declining in the U.S., possibly because of lack of Medicaid coverage."

Medicaid is the state-federal health insurance program for the poor and disabled.

Thirty-three million people globally are infected with AIDS, which has no cure and no vaccine. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the world, with 20 million people in the United States infected. It causes cervical cancer, which kills 300,000 women globally every year.



(former member)

(former member) Avatar

Location: hotel in Las Vegas
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 17, 2008 - 5:10pm



The Virtues Of Going Barefoot...

As we age, or gross motor (GM) coordination tends to decline, which leads to decreased mobility, a loss of balance, and a risk of falling...  one cause of this is wearing shoes, because over time, the identical sensation from our shoes dulls the sensory input from our feet...  shoes, worn for decades, limit the sensory feedback from our feet to our brains...

if we go barefoot, our brains will receive many different kinds of input as we walk over uneven surfaces...  shoes are a flat platform that spreads out the stimuli, and the surfaces we walk on are artificial and flat...  this leads us to dedifferentiate the maps for the soles of our feet and limit how touch guides our foot control...

people may start to use canes, walkers, or crutches or rely on other senses to steady themselves, and by resorting to these compensations instead of exercising the sensory input abilities of people's bare feet, they hasten their decline...

for example, as people age, they tend to look down while walking, because they are not getting much information from the stunted sensory tools in their feet...  this sensory compensation with vision causes even more decline in sensory input from sheathed feet...  go barefoot when you can, people...  feel your way with your bare feet, because this will develop the sensory map for each foot, instead of letting it waste away... 




kctomato

kctomato Avatar



Posted: Dec 15, 2008 - 6:57am

 romeotuma wrote:


Scabies


Seems I heard somewhere that sniffing glue helps

musik_knut

musik_knut Avatar

Location: Third Stone From The Sun
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 13, 2008 - 5:57pm

 hippiechick wrote:

Well, no duh! Women have known this for several years. I took HRT for almost 10 yrs, but the smallest dose I could get away with, because I started asking women that I knew had breast cancer if they took HRT, and most of them had.

So, what about birth control pills? And what about the ones that stop women from menstruating? More hormones?
 

hc,
Does appear to be a study of the obvious. But in medicine, there is often a trailing period between what is thought on the street and what is shown in a study.
In my opinion, birth control pills quite possibly play a role in women who without any obvious physical or physiological reasons, can not become pregnant or tend to lose their pregnancies in above normal numbers. Has there been a study on that since bc pills first hit the public? I don't doubt we're poisoning ourselves: a hormone for this, an antibiotic for that. Then there's the stuff we dump in our food chain, the goodies we feed our cattle and the like.

mk...
hippiechick

hippiechick Avatar

Location: topsy turvy land
Gender: Female


Posted: Dec 13, 2008 - 5:51pm

 musik_knut wrote:
New study firmly ties hormone use to breast cancer

SAN ANTONIO (AP) - Taking menopause hormones for five years doubles the risk for breast cancer, according to a new analysis of a big federal study that reveals the most dramatic evidence yet of the dangers of these still-popular pills.
Even women who took estrogen and progestin pills for as little as a couple of years had a greater chance of getting cancer. And when they stopped taking them, their odds quickly improved, returning to a normal risk level roughly two years after quitting.

Collectively, these new findings are likely to end any doubt that the risks outweigh the benefits for most women.

It is clear that breast cancer rates plunged in recent years mainly because millions of women quit hormone therapy and fewer newly menopausal women started on it, said the study's leader, Dr. Rowan Chlebowski of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles.

"It's an excellent message for women: You can still diminish risk (by quitting), even if you've been on hormones for a long time," said Dr. Claudine Isaacs of Georgetown University's Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. "It's not like smoking where you have to wait 10 or 15 years for the risk to come down."

Study results were given Saturday at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

They are from the Women's Health Initiative, which tested estrogen and progestin pills that doctors long believed would prevent heart disease, bone loss and many other problems in women after menopause. The main part of the study was stopped in 2002 when researchers saw surprisingly higher risks of heart problems and breast cancer in hormone users.

Since then, experts have debated whether these risks apply to women who start on hormones when they enter menopause, usually in their 50s, and take them for shorter periods of time. Most of the women in the federal study were in their 60s and well past menopause.

So the advice has been to use hormones only if symptoms like hot flashes are severe, and at the lowest dose and shortest time possible. The new study sharpens that message, Chlebowski said.

"It does change the balance" on whether to start on treatment at all, he said.

Even so, most women will not get breast cancer by taking the pills short-term. The increased cancer risk from a couple of years of hormone use translates to a few extra cases of breast cancer a year for every 1,000 women on hormones. This risk accumulates with each year of use, though.

The Women's Health Initiative study had two parts. In one, 16,608 women closely matched for age, weight and other health factors were randomly assigned to take either Wyeth Pharmaceuticals' Prempro - estrogen and progestin - or dummy pills.

This part was halted when researchers saw a 26% higher risk of breast cancer in those on Prempro.

But that was an average over the 5½ years women were on the pills. For the new study, researchers tracked 15,387 of these women through July 2005, and plotted breast cancer cases as they occurred over time.

They saw a clear trend: Risk rose with the start of use, peaked when the study ended and fell as nearly all hormone users stopped taking their pills. At the peak, the breast cancer risk for pill takers was twice that of the others.

Think of it as President Bush's public approval rating, said another study leader, Dr. Peter Ravdin of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

"Bush's popularity may be 50% on average, but it might have been descending the whole time he was president," Ravdin said.

In the second part of the federal study, researchers observed just 16,121 women who had already been on hormones for an average of seven years and another group of 25,328 women who had never used them. No results on breast cancer risk in these women have been given until now.

Plotting cases over time, researchers saw in retrospect that hormone users had started out with twice the risk of breast cancer as the others, and it fell as use declined. Among those taking hormones at the start of the study, use dropped to 41% in 2003, the year after the main results made news.

In the general population, use of hormone products has dropped 70% since the study, said another of its leaders, Dr. JoAnn Manson, preventive medicine chief at Harvard's Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

That corresponds with big drops in breast cancer cases, but some scientists have said this could be due to a fall-off in mammograms, which would mean fewer cancers were being detected, not necessarily that fewer were occurring.

The new study puts that theory to rest. Mammography rates were virtually the same among those taking hormones and those not.

"It is clear that changing mammography patterns cannot explain the dramatic reductions in breast cancer risk," Manson said.

"The data are getting stronger," said Dr. C. Kent Osborne, a breast cancer specialist at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

Women who do need the pills should not panic, though the doubling of risk - a 200% increase - for long-term users is quite worrisome, cancer specialists say. Although the new study does not calculate risks in terms of actual cases, previous research showed that the average increased risk of 26% meant a difference of a few extra cases a year for every 1,000 women on hormone pills, compared with nonusers.

"Hormone therapy remains a good health care choice to relieve moderate to severe menopausal symptoms," says a statement from Wyeth, which made the pills used in the study.

"Most women should be able to discontinue hormones in three to four years," or at least reduce their dose, Manson said.

A future analysis will look at other women in the study who took only estrogen, generally women who have had hysterectomies.



 
Well, no duh! Women have known this for several years. I took HRT for almost 10 yrs, but the smallest dose I could get away with, because I started asking women that I knew had breast cancer if they took HRT, and most of them had.

So, what about birth control pills? And what about the ones that stop women from menstruating? More hormones?

musik_knut

musik_knut Avatar

Location: Third Stone From The Sun
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 13, 2008 - 5:47pm

New study firmly ties hormone use to breast cancer

SAN ANTONIO (AP) - Taking menopause hormones for five years doubles the risk for breast cancer, according to a new analysis of a big federal study that reveals the most dramatic evidence yet of the dangers of these still-popular pills.
Even women who took estrogen and progestin pills for as little as a couple of years had a greater chance of getting cancer. And when they stopped taking them, their odds quickly improved, returning to a normal risk level roughly two years after quitting.

Collectively, these new findings are likely to end any doubt that the risks outweigh the benefits for most women.

It is clear that breast cancer rates plunged in recent years mainly because millions of women quit hormone therapy and fewer newly menopausal women started on it, said the study's leader, Dr. Rowan Chlebowski of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles.

"It's an excellent message for women: You can still diminish risk (by quitting), even if you've been on hormones for a long time," said Dr. Claudine Isaacs of Georgetown University's Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. "It's not like smoking where you have to wait 10 or 15 years for the risk to come down."

Study results were given Saturday at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

They are from the Women's Health Initiative, which tested estrogen and progestin pills that doctors long believed would prevent heart disease, bone loss and many other problems in women after menopause. The main part of the study was stopped in 2002 when researchers saw surprisingly higher risks of heart problems and breast cancer in hormone users.

Since then, experts have debated whether these risks apply to women who start on hormones when they enter menopause, usually in their 50s, and take them for shorter periods of time. Most of the women in the federal study were in their 60s and well past menopause.

So the advice has been to use hormones only if symptoms like hot flashes are severe, and at the lowest dose and shortest time possible. The new study sharpens that message, Chlebowski said.

"It does change the balance" on whether to start on treatment at all, he said.

Even so, most women will not get breast cancer by taking the pills short-term. The increased cancer risk from a couple of years of hormone use translates to a few extra cases of breast cancer a year for every 1,000 women on hormones. This risk accumulates with each year of use, though.

The Women's Health Initiative study had two parts. In one, 16,608 women closely matched for age, weight and other health factors were randomly assigned to take either Wyeth Pharmaceuticals' Prempro - estrogen and progestin - or dummy pills.

This part was halted when researchers saw a 26% higher risk of breast cancer in those on Prempro.

But that was an average over the 5½ years women were on the pills. For the new study, researchers tracked 15,387 of these women through July 2005, and plotted breast cancer cases as they occurred over time.

They saw a clear trend: Risk rose with the start of use, peaked when the study ended and fell as nearly all hormone users stopped taking their pills. At the peak, the breast cancer risk for pill takers was twice that of the others.

Think of it as President Bush's public approval rating, said another study leader, Dr. Peter Ravdin of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

"Bush's popularity may be 50% on average, but it might have been descending the whole time he was president," Ravdin said.

In the second part of the federal study, researchers observed just 16,121 women who had already been on hormones for an average of seven years and another group of 25,328 women who had never used them. No results on breast cancer risk in these women have been given until now.

Plotting cases over time, researchers saw in retrospect that hormone users had started out with twice the risk of breast cancer as the others, and it fell as use declined. Among those taking hormones at the start of the study, use dropped to 41% in 2003, the year after the main results made news.

In the general population, use of hormone products has dropped 70% since the study, said another of its leaders, Dr. JoAnn Manson, preventive medicine chief at Harvard's Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

That corresponds with big drops in breast cancer cases, but some scientists have said this could be due to a fall-off in mammograms, which would mean fewer cancers were being detected, not necessarily that fewer were occurring.

The new study puts that theory to rest. Mammography rates were virtually the same among those taking hormones and those not.

"It is clear that changing mammography patterns cannot explain the dramatic reductions in breast cancer risk," Manson said.

"The data are getting stronger," said Dr. C. Kent Osborne, a breast cancer specialist at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

Women who do need the pills should not panic, though the doubling of risk - a 200% increase - for long-term users is quite worrisome, cancer specialists say. Although the new study does not calculate risks in terms of actual cases, previous research showed that the average increased risk of 26% meant a difference of a few extra cases a year for every 1,000 women on hormone pills, compared with nonusers.

"Hormone therapy remains a good health care choice to relieve moderate to severe menopausal symptoms," says a statement from Wyeth, which made the pills used in the study.

"Most women should be able to discontinue hormones in three to four years," or at least reduce their dose, Manson said.

A future analysis will look at other women in the study who took only estrogen, generally women who have had hysterectomies.


hippiechick

hippiechick Avatar

Location: topsy turvy land
Gender: Female


Posted: Dec 9, 2008 - 8:43am

 romeotuma wrote:

 

Attacking Alzheimer's with Red Wine and Marijuana

By Tom Jacobs, Miller-McCune - Turning Research Into Solutions
Posted December 8, 2008.

Two new studies point to a wonderful way to ward off Alzheimer's disease and other forms of age-related memory loss.

Two new studies suggest that substances usually associated with dulling the mind — marijuana and red wine — may help ward off Alzheimer's disease and other forms of age-related memory loss. Their addition comes as another study dethrones folk remedy ginkgo biloba as proof against the disease.

At a November meeting of the Society of Neuroscience in Washington, D.C., researchers from Ohio State University reported that THC, the main psychoactive substance in the cannabis plant, may reduce inflammation in the brain and even stimulate the formation of new brain cells.

Meanwhile, in the Nov. 21 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, neurologist David Teplow of the University of California, Los Angeles reported that polyphenols — naturally occurring components of red wine — block the formation of proteins that build the toxic plaques thought to destroy brain cells. In addition, these substances can reduce the toxicity of existing plaques, thus reducing cognitive deterioration.

Together, the studies suggest scientists are gaining a clearer understanding of the mechanics of memory deterioration and discovering some promising approaches to prevention.

Previous research has suggested that polyphenols — which are found in high concentrations in tea, nuts and berries, as well as cabernets and merlots — may inhibit or prevent the buildup of toxic fibers in the brain. These fibers, which are primarily composed of two specific proteins, form the plaques that have long been associated with Alzheimer's disease.

UCLA's Teplow and his colleagues monitored how these proteins folded up and stuck to each other to produce aggregates that killed nerve cells in mice. They then treated the proteins with a polyphenol compound extracted from grape seeds. They discovered the polyphenols blocked the formation of the toxic aggregates.

"What we found is pretty straightforward," Teplow declared. "If the amyloid beta proteins can't assemble, toxic aggregates can't form, and, thus, there is no toxicity." If this also proves true in human brains, it means administration of the compound to Alzheimer's patients could "prevent disease development and also ameliorate existing disease," he said. Human clinical trials are upcoming.

At Ohio State, researchers led by psychologist Gary Wenk are studying the protective effects of tetrahydrocannabinol, commonly known as THC. They found that administering a THC-like synthetic drug to older rats performed better at a memory test than a control group of non-medicated elderly rodents.

In some of the rats, the drug apparently lowered inflammation in the hippocampus — the region of the brain responsible for short-term memory. It also seems to have stimulated the generation of new brain cells.

"When we're young, we reproduce neurons and our memory works fine," said co-author Yannick Marchalant, another Ohio State psychologist. "When we age, the process slows down, so we have a decrease in new cell formation in normal aging. You need those cells to come back and help form new memories, and we found that this THC-like agent can influence creation of those cells."

Wenk added two cautionary notes to his report. First, to be effective, any such treatment along these lines would have to take place before memory loss is obvious. Second, the researchers still have much work to do.

"We need to find exactly which receptors are most crucial" to the generation of new brain cells, he said. This discovery would "ideally lead to the development of drugs that specifically activate those receptors."

In the meantime, should aging baby boomers who are worried about old-age mental impairment light up a joint? Wenk was cautious in his answer, no doubt because marijuana is suspected to be harmful to health in other ways.

"Could people smoke marijuana to prevent Alzheimer's disease if the disease is in the family? We're not saying that, but it might actually work," he said. "What we are saying is it appears that a safe, legal substance the mimics those important properties of marijuana can work on receptors in the brain to prevent memory impairments in aging. So that's really hopeful."



 
I can still remember my kids' names, so it must work for me!


meower

meower Avatar

Location: i believe, i believe, it's silly, but I believe
Gender: Female


Posted: Dec 8, 2008 - 10:22am

 romeotuma wrote:


I never said white noise is a cause— I said it was a major contributor to triggering autism...  things like autism are so complex that it is unlikely there is a single cause, but a complex combination of factors... here, I will quote directly from a hard copy of the book—

During the critical period BDNF turns on the nucleus basalis, the part of our brain that allows us to focus our attention — and kees it on, throughout the entire critical period...

Merzenich's work on the critical period and BDNF helped him develop a theory that explains how so many different problems could be part of a single autistic whole.  During the critical period, he argues, some situations overexcite the neurons in children who have genes that predispose them to autism, leading to the massive, premature release of BDNF.  Instead of important connections being reinforced, all connections are.  So much BDNF is released that it turns off the critical period prematurely, sealing all these connection in place, and the child is left with scores of undifferentiated brain maps and hence pervasive developmental disorders.  Their brains are hyperexcitable and hypersensitive.  If they hear one frequency, the whole auditory cortex starts firing...

If the BDNF release was contributing to autism and language problems, Merzenich needed to understand what might cause young neurons to get "over excited" and release massive amounts of the chemical.  Several studies alerted him to how an environmental factor might contribute.  One disturbing study showed that the closer children lived to the noisy airport in Frankfurt, Germany, the lower their intelligence was.  A similar study on children in public housing high-rises above the Dan Ryan Expressway in Chicago, found that the closer their floor was to the highway, the lower their intelligence...

White noise consists of many frequencies and is very stimulating to the auditory cortex.

 
sorry I reread your post.  I'm gonna look more at the book. 

Page: Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 44, 45, 46, 47, 48  Next